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(RM) 601163354
THE CONFEDERATE SLOOP-OF-WAR "290" OR ALABAMA, LEAVING THE MERCHANT-SHIP TONOWANDA, 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
The Confederate sloop-of-war "290" or Alabama, leaving the merchant-ship Tonowanda, 1862. Engraving from a sketch by Mr. W. Woods. 'The Alabama, formerly the 290...has a 109-pounder rifled pivot-gun forward of the bridge, and a 63-pounder on the main-deck...the Attorney and Solicitor General, have given opinions that her sailing so armed and on such an errand as hers was a breach of the Queen's proclamation of neutrality...Our Engraving...represents the Alabama leaving the Tonowanda after having put on board that vessel the captains and crews of several Federal merchantmen which she had taken as prizes and burnt. The ship Tonowanda...was captured by the Alabama on the 9th of October...Captain Julius was taken on board, and found there Captain Harmon and crew, of the late barque Wave Crest...and Captain Johnson and crew, of the late brig Dunkirk...all prisoners and in irons on deck, their vessels having been burnt two days previous...No more prizes were taken till the evening of the 13th, and, there being every appearance of thick weather, Captain Julius was put on board the Tonowanda and allowed to proceed, after having given a ransom bond. All the captains, officers, and crews are parolled prisoners of war'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The Confederate sloop-of-war "290" or Alabama, leaving the merchant-ship Tonowanda, 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601163034
A NIGHT SCENE ON THE NILE NEAR THE MOUTH OF THE CAIRO CANAL, DURING THE FESTIVAL OF GEBR..., 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
A night scene on the Nile near the mouth of the Cairo canal, during the festival of Gebr-el-Haleeg, or breaking the canal, 1862. View of '...the "Yom Wefa el Nil" (or "day of the completion or abundance of the river")...[an] ancient and singular festival...[which] is simply the breaking or cutting of a dam that is constructed at the mouth of the Cairo Canal after the Nile has commenced rising, which generally happens about the period of the summer solstice...The amusements are continued throughout the night...Those who can afford it prefer passing the evening on board a "dahabieh," or pleasure-boat...Shortly after sunset the fireworks commence, and continue at intervals throughout the night. On this occasion the display was more than ordinarily magnificent...A battery of fieldpieces in position upon the plain, in the immediate vicinity of the canal, varied the entertainments by occasional salvos, the natives having the keenest relish for this description of music...The noise and confusion are astounding. Steamers and sailing-vessels are crowded together promiscuously; all are decorated with variegated lamps...The large tower to the right is the "Sakior," used for the purpose of raising water for the supply of Cairo'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. A night scene on the Nile near the mouth of the Cairo canal, during the festival of Gebr..., 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601162744
THE MELBOURNE AND HOBSON'S BAY RAILWAY COMPANY'S PIER AT SANDRIDGE, NEAR MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
The Melbourne and Hobson's Bay Railway Company's pier at Sandridge, near Melbourne, Australia, 1862. In 1853-4, '... the cost of transit, by lighters from the shipping in the bay, via the circuitous route of the River Yarra Yarra, to the wharves in Melbourne averaged from 45s. to 35s. per ton, but, on the opening of this railway pier for traffic, these rates were reduced to one-seventh...It is constructed of the best colonial hardwood, supported upon blue gum piles...The pier is lighted with gas, and water...is laid on the entire length...From the period of its opening...upwards of half a million tons of merchandise have passed over the line from vessels at the pier...A large and increasing coal traffic has also sprung up within the last two years, by which upwards of ton thousand tons of that invaluable mineral are annually discharged at the pier and conveyed by rail...At the time the accompanying sketch was taken the following vessels were lying alongside: On the east or left side, the Gondola, Hercules steamer, Thomas Brown, Dover Castle, Success, Blue Jacket, and Sirocco; on the west or right side, leading from the pier gates, the celebrated steamers Aldinga, Water Nymph, Vortigern, Suffolk, Queen of England, Agincourt, and Lord Raglan'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The Melbourne and Hobson's Bay Railway Company's pier at Sandridge, near Melbourne, Australia, 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601162474
THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE'S OFFICIAL VISIT TO THE CHANNEL ISLANDS..., 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
The Duke of Cambridge's official visit to the Channel Islands: reception of His Royal Highness at St. Peter Port, Guernsey, 1862. 'Herm; Jethou; Sark; Castle Cornet'. Senior royal on '...an official visit of inspection, as General Commanding-in-Chief...The landing-place and adjoining quay were decorated with a profusion of flags, including the Royal Standard...a guard of honour, consisting of fifty men of the Royal Artillery...and two companies of the rifles of the 1st Regiment of Royal Guernsey Militia...were drawn up near the landing-stage, where were also the constables and Douzeniers and police of the town parish...The Vivid having been brought to in the roadstead, his Royal Highness and suite embarked in two of the yacht's boats, which were speedily pulled to the landing-place, where he was received by the Lieutenant Governor...the troops saluted and the bands of the town regiment and Royal Artillery played the first bars of the National Anthem, the large assemblage greeting him with hearty cheers, which he courteously acknowledged. His Royal Highness, with one of his Aides-de-Camp and General Slade, then entered the Lieutenant- Governor's carriage, and was driven to his Excellency's residence at Castle Carey'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The Duke of Cambridge's official visit to the Channel Islands..., 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601162288
VIEW OF THE GULF OF SPEZIA: SHOWING THE HOUSE AT VARIGNANO IN WHICH GARIBALDI IS CONFINED, 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
View of the Gulf of Spezia [in Italy]: showing the house at Varignano in which Garibaldi is confined, 1862. 'The Gulf of Spezia...takes its name from the town of Spezia, which lies at its head. The gulf...is surrounded on all sides, except on the south, by lofty mountains, which shelter its waters from nearly every wind. Its shores are curved, by the descending spurs of the mountains, into several coves...in each of which several ships of war can lie in perfect security. One of these coves is lent to the American Government and another to the Russian Government, to serve as depots to the ships of war in the Mediterranean; while the fourth inlet on the right, on which buildings are visible, is Varignano, the arsenal of the Italian fleet. Here are the lazarettos, the residence of the commandant of the arsenal, large barracks and storehouses; and here, also, is situated Garibaldi's prison. The shores of the gulf are most picturesque. Lofty mountains sweep down to the water's edge, from the heights of which frown modern fortifications; while on the lower promontories are perched ruined Genoese forts. On one side is the town of Porto Venere, founded by Greek colonists...while on the other side is Lerici, with its picturesque fort'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. View of the Gulf of Spezia: showing the house at Varignano in which Garibaldi is confined, 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601162268
THE NEW IRON-CLAD FLEET: LAUNCH AT CHATHAM DOCKYARD OF H.M.S. FRIGATE ROYAL OAK, 50 GUNS, 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
The new iron-clad fleet: launch at Chatham Dockyard of H.M.S. frigate Royal Oak, 50 guns, 1862. '...the first completed of a new class of wooden vessels in the course of construction under the special direction of the Admiralty, and the first iron-cased war-ship built at the Royal dockyards [by Mr. 0. W. Lang. She has]...engines of 1000-horse power by Messrs. Maudslay...in the Royal Oak the usual figure-head, the graceful cutwater, and all the elaborate moulding that the eye is accustomed to meet in the bows of the earlier ships is entirely dispensed with, and a massive iron stem, with a sharp outward curve, for the purpose of being used as a ram, is substituted. The alteration from the general form of stem is still more complete, the lines at the counter and hammock netting running off to a point as fine as the bows of a schooner - a most excellent arrangement for the prevention of a vessel being raked. On each broadside of the ship three rows of iron plates, 4½in. thick, and weighing between four and five hundred tons, are already in their places. She will he encased in iron from stem to stem, the plates tapering off to about half the above-mentioned thickness at those parts, the armour descending to five feet below the water-line'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The new iron-clad fleet: launch at Chatham Dockyard of H.M.S. frigate Royal Oak, 50 guns, 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601162139
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN LEAVING GREENHITHE IN THE ROYAL YACHT FOR GERMANY, 1862. CREATOR: SMYTH.
Her Majesty the Queen leaving Greenhithe [in Kent] in the Royal Yacht for Germany, 1862. '...notwithstanding the strict privacy under which it was her Majesty's desire to take her departure and the precautions adopted by the authorities to exclude all visitors from the vicinity of the place of embarkation, the railway-trains and river steam-boats poured in their thousands of visitors, and long before midday the road facing the dockyard was thronged with a multitude of her Majesty's subjects of both sexes, anxious to catch even a mere glimpse of their Queen. On the approach of the first of the Royal carriages it was observed that the blinds were closely drawn, when the most respectful silence was simultaneously observed and strictly maintained throughout...Her Majesty was...received on board the Fairy by Captain Seymour, C.B., commanding the Royal yacht...the vessel steamed down to Green-hithe, preceded by the Bustler, to clear a passage from the numerous craft crowding about the roadstead. The Fairy was followed by the Vivid and a couple of steam-vessels belonging to the Trinity Board and the Conservators of the Thames, which acted as escort'. (Queen Victoria was in mourning for her husband Prince Albert who had died nine months earlier). From "Illustrated London News", 1862. Her Majesty the Queen leaving Greenhithe in the Royal Yacht for Germany, 1862. Creator: Smyth. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601161199
THE GIG AND WHALER H.M.S. GORGON OFF THE HIGH HILL OF MAKANGA, IN THE RIVER SHERI, 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Visit of H.M.S. Gorgon to the Zambesi River: The gig and whaler H.M.S. Gorgon off the high hill of Makanga, in the River Sheri, 1862. Engraving from a sketch by Mr. Sewall, of her Majesty's ship Gorgon. 'The Pioneer had discharged all her cargo at Chupanga, and the doctor [David Livingstone] has determined to put the Lady Nyassa together at that place, tow her up to the Murchison Falls, and there take her to pieces again. This will probably occupy the best part of this season, so that unforeseen circumstances have disappointed all the hopes that were formed at first starting...The Pioneer brought down the Gorgon's party to the entrance of the river on the 18th, and intended returning to Chupanga with the rest of the steamer's gear, which had been landed on her first arrival. The Gorgon had been driven away from her anchorage in a gale and did not return till April 2. After giving the Pioneer all the provisions and stores that could be spared, and which were calculated to last several months, we parted company with Dr. Livingstone and his party, with three hearty cheers, on April 4, en route for the Cape. The Gorgon's ship's company has suffered considerably from fever, nearly every man and officer having been attacked'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The gig and whaler H.M.S. Gorgon off the high hill of Makanga, in the River Sheri, 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601161194
THE PIONEER WITH BOATS IN TOW LADEN WITH PARTS OF THE STEAMER FOR DR. LIVINGSTONE, 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Visit of H.M.S. Gorgon to the Zambesi River: The Pioneer passing Mozambala with boats in tow laden with parts of the steamer for Dr. Livingstone, 1862. Engraving from a sketch by Mr. Sewall, of her Majesty's ship Gorgon. 'In consequence of Dr. Livingstone representing that it was most desirable to get his new steamer the Lady Nyassa up to the Murchison Falls before the Zambesi began to subside, and thereby save twelve months' delay, Commander Wilson decided on rendering every assistance in his power in furtherance of the object in view. Fifty men and officers were told off, armed, and provisioned for a month, with the intention of their being employed in discharging the sections of the steamer into the Pioneer and accompanying the latter vessel up to the falls...when all was ready, the Pioneer took the brig and two of the Gorgon's paddle-box boats in tow and steamed over the Congony bar, and anchored in a little way inside the river, when all hands immediately set to work to clear the Hetty Ellen. Placing the sections of the Lady Nyassa on the deck of the Pioneer, they took up every inch of room and reached halfway up her masts. The work was expeditiously and cleverly performed'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The Pioneer with boats in tow laden with parts of the steamer for Dr. Livingstone, 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601161189
THE BRIG HETTY ELLEN DISCHARGING SECTIONS OF DR. LIVINGSTONE'S NEW STEAMER..., 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Visit of H.M.S. Gorgon to the Zambesi River: The brig Hetty Ellen discharging sections of Dr. Livingstone's new steamer the Lady Nyassa into the Pioneer to take up the Zambesi, 1862. Engraving from a sketch by Mr. Sewall, of her Majesty's ship Gorgon. '...a brig hove in sight...[she] proved to be the Hetty Ellen, of Newport, laden with the sections of a small iron steamer - the Lady Nyassa - intended for Dr. Livingstone...Mrs. Livingstone [a passenger on the Hetty Ellen] was trying to join her husband...We had the satisfaction of hearing that the doctor, in his little steamer the Pioneer, was trying to make his way down the Zambesi...the Gorgon, therefore, proceeded there without delay with the brig, but on getting off Luabo the Pioneer was discovered at anchor inside the bar. Captain Wilson immediately communicated, but nearly lost his life and that of the boat's crew, for his gig was swamped in going over. The next morning the doctor came out in his steamer, when a happy meeting took place between him and Mrs. Livingstone...A quantity of the O.C.D.D. Mission goods was landed beside the Portuguese Custom House and placed under tents, it being impossible to carry them up in the Pioneer, no other mode of transit having been provided'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The brig Hetty Ellen discharging sections of Dr. Livingstone's new steamer..., 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601161089
THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA: POSITION OF THE FEDERAL FLOTILLA ON THE MISSISSIPPI..., 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
The Civil War in America: position of the Federal flotilla on the Mississippi, off Fort Pillow, shortly before its evacuation, from a sketch by our special artist, 1862. 'Craighead Point; Chickasaw Bluffs, on which is Fort Pillow...[View of] the position of the flotilla shortly before the evacuation of that fort by the Confederates. In a letter written in a transport off Fort Pillow, on the 31st of May last, our Special Artist writes as follows: "Our mortars have been pegging away at Fort Pillow for the last day or two without intermission, and we occasionally get a shell in return, Unfortunately, the Federalists cannot well ascertain the effect of their fire, as all they can see of the fort or its position is simply the rise of the bluff on which it is situated above the bend in the river...The national morter-rafts are placed against the Arkansas shore, immediately under the bank, and half a mile of dense forest lies between them and the winding bed of the river which flows by the fort. The shells are thrown over the trees, the range being calculated by a daily reconnaissance sent to observe the effect of the bombardment; but this reconnaissance is not always successful, for the woods are often filled by Confederate scouts..." From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The Civil War in America: position of the Federal flotilla on the Mississippi..., 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601161049
THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA: DESTRUCTION OF THE CONFEDERATE FLOTILLA..., 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
The Civil War in America: destruction of the Confederate flotilla off Memphis - from a sketch by our special artist, 1862. 'Memphis, the hotbed of Secession, has fallen... we...came in full view of the Confederate fleet, eight in number, drawn up in line across the river to dispute our progress...The General Bragg now came up to the assistance of the Beauregard and struck the Queen of the West on her port paddle-box, crushing it in, but in turn got a huge rent in her port bow...the other Federal ram, the Monarch, bore down towards the General Lovell, and, striking her amidships...in three minutes she sunk in one hundred feet of water, taking with her most of her crew. Thus two of the Confederate boats were disposed of, six only being left for the five national vessels to contend with, the rams retiring from the fight...The Jeff Thompson was set on fire by a shell from a Federal boat, and...blew up shortly after she was abandoned; the General Bragg also was struck by a shell and her cotton bulkheads ignited, but the crew of the Benton, who boarded her, succeeded in extinguishing the fire. To sum up the whole affair, one Confederate vessel alone escaped...three were destroyed, and four were captured after a running fight of one hour and a half'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The Civil War in America: destruction of the Confederate flotilla..., 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601160929
TOWN AND PORT OF ACAPULCO, ON THE WEST COAST OF MEXICO, WITH THE ENGLISH AND FRENCH SQUADRON...,1862 CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Town and port of Acapulco, on the west coast of Mexico, with the English and French squadron lying in the harbour, 1862. Engraving from a sketch by Mr. Boyle of the Termagant. 'Acapulco, one of the principal Mexican ports in the Pacific, is also well known on account of its admirable harbour, which affords...a secure anchorage for the largest vessels. It is one of the stations at which it was considered desirable in the recent state of affairs with Mexico to have a squadron at anchor prepared to use force if necessary in support of the claims of the English, French, and Spanish Governments. Accordingly...ships of war were dispatched from Panama...The ships off Acapulco, in April last, were the Bacchante [in a position commanding the fort], (Rear-Admiral Maitland), Termagant, and Clio... as a measure of precaution, the military authorities dismantled the fort and removed the guns some miles inland...The fort, which apparently is of considerable strength and constructed of stone, was evidently considered by the Mexicans as indefensible against the heavy guns carried by modern ships of war, more especially as the great depth of water would allow a large frigate to deliver her broadside within a few yards of the fortification'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. Town and port of Acapulco, on the west coast of Mexico, with the English and French squadron...,1862 Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601160199
DEPARTURE OF THE NONCOMFORMISTS FROM LONDON...FOR THE NEW COLONY..., 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Departure of the Noncomformists from London, on Thursday week, for the new colony of Albertland, New Zealand: scene on board the Matilda Wattenbach on her passage down the river [Thames], 1862. 'Availing themselves of the liberal offer of the New Zealand Government to grant forty acres of land to every emigrant paying his passage to the colony...Mr. W. R. Brame and a number of friends have organised an emigration on an extensive scale...Only such persons were selected as possessed a certain amount of capital or were proficient in some valuable mechanical avocation, or were in other points calculated to prove profitable to the new colony...At half-past eleven a hymn was sung, in which the vast crowd united, and they were accompanied by a powerful brass band. The Chairman then delivered a brief address, bidding the emigrants "God speed," wishing them a pleasant voyage and a happy realisation of their fondest hopes in the land of their adoption, where he trusted they would found a prosperous and important community...The leave-takings were of the most exciting and sometimes painful description. The band played "Auld Lang Syne," and its plaintive strains drew tears from the eyes of many who had till then remained apparently unmoved'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. Departure of the Noncomformists from London...for the new colony..., 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601159829
ROSALIND AND CELIA ("AS YOU LIKE IT", BY MISS EDWARDS IN THE EXHIBITION OF THE SOCIETY..., 1862. CREATOR: W THOMAS.
Rosalind and Celia ("As You Like It", by Miss Edwards in the Exhibition of the Society of British Artists, 1862. Engraving of a painting '...by a lady previously unknown to fame...Poor Rosalind! So fair and feminine...she should never have assumed the male attire...she makes...a very a sorry page. Her sprightly, witty companion may well banter her upon her effeminacy...The pretty runaways should, at all events, change their costumes...We think that the almost querulous plaints of the tenderhearted lovelorn maiden, her yearning for some casual word of comfort from her kind and faithful though mischievous companion, is expressed with extraordinary felicity, not only in the expression of Rosalind's face, but in her pretty lackadaisical attitude, the wobegone inclination of the head, and the action of both hands. Miss Edwards has avoided a vulgar reading...by making the assumption of the page's dress not too obvious and complete. The contrast of the dark-eyed mercurial Celia is equally happy; her protecting, supporting, and admonishing gestures (seen again in the action of the hands more particularly), her charmingly arch expression, and her air of superior wisdom and firmness as she counsels and rallies her weaker companion all in a breath'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. Rosalind and Celia ("As You Like It", by Miss Edwards in the Exhibition of the Society..., 1862. Creator: W Thomas. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601159084
THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA: HATTERAS SPIT, WITH THE WRECK OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK ON THE... 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
The Civil War in America: Hatteras Spit, with the wreck of the City of New York on the bar in the distance - from a sketch by our special artist, 1862. 'My vessel was the Picket, a screw, the smallest in the fleet, on which General Burnside had established his head-quarters...when we had got six miles down the roads towards Cape Henry, the General gave instructions to our Captain to shape his course for Hatteras, and then, for the first time, I became aware of our destination. We were to pass over the bulkhead of Pamlico Sound and attack the Confederate position at Roanoke Island...Day broke with a leaden sky, against which the angry, white-crested waves raced their mad career over the reefs of Cape Hatteras, that threw its headland oceanwards but eight miles distant...On the 14th, the day after our arrival, the City of New York struck on the bar, and in a short time became a total wreck...Fortunately, the crew and those on board were saved in surf-boats, but three other poor fellows attempting to reach the harbour in a launch from a weather-bound vessel outside got capsized in the breakers, and sank before our eyes...The three lost were the mate of the ship and the Colonel and doctor of the New Jersey regiment'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862 The Civil War in America: Hatteras Spit, with the wreck of the City of New York on the... 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601159048
THE VOLUNTEER LYING INSIDE THE BAR OF KOWIE RIVER, PORT ALFRED, NEAR GRAHAM'S TOWN, CAPE..., 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
The Volunteer lying inside the bar of Kowie River, Port Alfred, near Graham's Town, Cape Colony, 1862. Engraving from a photograph of the steamer '...having crossed the bar successfully on the 11th of December last...The Volunteer is only just inside the mouth of the river, a short distance from the open sea. Subsequently she steamed further in, and eventually anchored close to the building (Mr. Cock's steam-mill) shown in the Illustration. For many years past the colonists of the Cape of Good Hope residing in the eastern districts of that flourishing colony felt the necessity of securing a safe harbour for the numerous vessels visiting the south-east coast of Africa...a company was formed, recognised and assisted by the Colonial Government, to co-operate with Mr. Wm. Cock [an enterprising colonist], when a sum of £50,000 was raised to carry on the work. Mr. Rendall, the eminent engineer, was consulted, who, after sending Mr. Tucker, one of his staff, to inspect and report on the practicability of clearing away the sand at the mouth of the river, prepared plans and pronounced the work to be practicable. Mr. Rendall's plans have been almost rigidly adhered to'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The Volunteer lying inside the bar of Kowie River, Port Alfred, near Graham's Town, Cape..., 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601158614
THE REINFORCEMENTS FOR CANADA: SHIPPING HORSES ON BOARD THE CALCUTTA AT WOOLWICH BY THE..., 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
The Reinforcements for Canada: shipping horses on board the Calcutta at Woolwich by the hydraulic crane, 1862. 'Although there is now every reason to hope - if not, indeed, a full assurance - that the cloud which a short time ago gathered so darkly between this country and the Federal States of America has been entirely dissipated, still it is most gratifying to look back at the prompt action of our Government, and the zeal shown by all the officials engaged in carrying out their plans on that occasion...[Engraving of one of] the most picturesque scenes in connection with the shipment of troops and munitions of war to Canada...the shipping of the horses belonging to the H Battery of the fourth brigade of the Royal Artillery...The horses, forty-six in number, were shipped from the Arsenal Pier by the great hydraulic crane. The mode of doing it was very simple. They were taken alongside the crane, and a piece of hammock-cloth was passed under their bellies and made fast to the cranehook; the word was given and off they went, first a short distance upward, then round over the deck, on which they were quickly and easily lowered. They were then put into their berths - good-sized, padded boxes, secured for the voyage'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. The Reinforcements for Canada: shipping horses on board the Calcutta at Woolwich by the..., 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
(RM) 601158579
FLOATING PONTOONS OR DOCK PREPARED BY MESSRS. RENNIE AND SON FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF SPAIN, 1862. CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Floating pontoons or dock prepared by Messrs. Rennie and Son for the government of Spain, 1862. 'Now that Spain is endeavouring to regain her position amongst the chief nations of Europe, and is reconstructing and increasing her navy, it is found that the docks which were hitherto of ample capacity for vessels formerly built are totally inadequate for the accommodation of the enormous line-of-battle ships and iron-cased frigates of which the navies of Europe are now composed. It has therefore been determined, without delay, to provide dry-dock conveniences of sufficient dimensions for the largest vessels in contemplation, and a floating dock having been considered most advisable to he adopted in the arsenals of Carthagena and Ferrol, the plans of Messrs. George Rennie and Sons have been decided on as most suitable for the purpose, and the firm has been instructed to provide the two above-named arsenals with floating docks, to be constructed according to the principle and patent recently taken out by them. These peculiar docks are being completed at the works of the firm, Holland-street, Blackfriars-road, previously to their being shipped for their destination'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. Floating pontoons or dock prepared by Messrs. Rennie and Son for the government of Spain, 1862. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/THE PRINT COLLECTOR)
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