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(RM) 407809374
MEDIEVAL WEAVING, EMBROIDERY, ENAMEL AND PAINTED SCULPTURE, (1898). CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Medieval weaving, embroidery, enamel and painted sculpture, (1898). 'Fig 1: Statue of St. Simon in the choir of Cologne Cathedral. Fig 2: Pattern on the robe of another statue ibid. Fig 3: Embroidered fonder of French origin. 14th century. Fig 4: Embroidered stuff (in the original, silver is employed instead of gold), 15th century. Fig 5: Embroidered stuff, 14th century. Figs 6-9: Borders and patterns of carpets from the wall-paintings in the upper church S. Francesco at Assisi. 14th century. Fig 10: Pattern of a carpet from a tempera-painting of Niccolo Alunno (1466) in the pinacotheca at Perugia. Fig 11: Sicilian weaving from St. Mary's church at Danzig, 13th century. Fig 12: Border of a carpet on the painting of Hugo van der Goes in the Palazzo degli Uffizi at Florence, 15th century. Fig 13: Border of a carpet on a picture of [by?] Mantegna in S. Zeno at Verona, late 15th century. Fig 14: Border from an embroidered chasuble, 14th century (German work). Figs 15 and 16: Patterns of stuffs from the 14th century, of French origin. Fig 17: Gilt copper-engraving from the cross-relics-table in the catholic parish-church at Mettlach. Figs 18-20: Enamelled decorations on the shrine of the Three Kings in Cologne Cathedral, early 13th century. Fig 21: Enamelled border in the Musée de Cluny, early 13th century'. Plate 42 from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898] (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/The Print Collector)
(RM) 407809134
MEDIEVAL STONE MOSAIC, (1898). CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Medieval stone mosaic, (1898). 'Figs 1-8: Engraved stone-flags from the old cathedral at St. Omer, 13th century (ground brown, interior design of horse and horseman filled up with red). Figs 9 and 10: Mosaic floors of burnt clay, enamelled, from a collection at Dresden (black and red centres with white edging) 13th century. Figs 11 and 12: Mosaic floors of burnt clay, enamelled, from the cloister-church Colombe-les-Sens (red, black and yellow), 12th century. Figs 13 and 14: Mosaic floors of burnt clay, enamelled, from the abbey-church at St. Denis (red, black and yellow), 12th century. Figs 15 and 16: Mosaic floors of burnt clay, enamelled, from the old abbey-church at Pontigny, 12th century (yellow, red and black on green ground). Figs 17-23: Enamelled clay-tiles from St. Pierre-sur-Dive, 12th century (yellow and black-brown). Figs 24 and 25: Enamelled clay-tiles from the church at Bloxham, 13th century (red and yellow). Figs 26 and 27: Enamelled clay-tiles from Beddington-Church in Surrey, 15th century (red and yellow). Fig 28: Engraved clay-tiles from the town-hall at Ravensburg (natural colour without glazing), 14th century. Fig 29: Engraved clay-tiles from a patrician house ibid., 14th century. Fig 30: Clay-tiles with deepened ground, natural colour without glazing, 14th century, from the church at Gaildorf. Fig 31: Clay-tiles with deepened ground and relief-figures from the cloister at Alpirsbach, 12th century. Plate 38 from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898] (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/The Print Collector)
(RM) 407809101
MEDIEVAL ENAMEL AND ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS, (1898). CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Medieval enamel and illuminated manuscripts, (1898). 'Fig: 1: Initial from a German manuscript (Rhenish school), 11th-12th century, in the Library at Paris. Fig 2: Initial from a German manuscript of the 12th century, from a private collection at Cologne. Fig 3: Relic-cross from the first half of the 12th cent, in the Diocesan-Museum at Freising. Fig 4: Pilaster from the shrine of St. Heribertus in the Benedictine-Abbey at Deutz, mid 12th century. Figs 5 and 10: From the shrine of the great relics at Aachen, 12th century. Fig 6: From a collection at Bonn, 12th century. Fig 7: Decoration from the Anno-shrine in the former abbey at Siegburg, 11th century. Figs 8 and 9: From a reliquary in South-Kensington Museum at London, 12th century. Fig 11: From a little reliquary, 12th century. Figs 12 and 13: From the portable altar of St. Andrews in the cathedral at Treves, 10th century. Fig 14: Flat disk of gilt copper in private possession at Bamberg, 12th century. Fig 15: Half from a shrine in the former abbey at Siegburg, 11th century. Figs 16-19: Decorations on double crosses at Essen, 11th century. Fig 20: Half figure of an angel from the shrine of St, Heribertus, see Fig 4. Fig 21: From the shrine of Charlemagne at Aachen, 12th century. Figs 22 and 23: From the Mauritius-shrine at Siegburg, 11th century. Fig 24: From an altar-wall, 12th century...In the art of enamelling, which had been transferred from Byzantium to Germany, the German artists attained a high point of perfection'. Plate 35 from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898] (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/The Print Collector)
(RM) 407808880
BYZANTINE ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE, (1898). CREATOR: KARL SCHAUPERT.
Byzantine architecture and sculpture, (1898). 'Fig 1: Capital from Agia Theotokos at Constantinople, late 9th century. Fig 2:Capital from S. Vitale at Ravenna. Fig 3: Lintel-decoration from Agia Theotokos at Constantinople. Fig 4: Chaptrel-cornice from the church of St. Nicolas at Myra. Fig 5: Pilaster-capital from Agia Sofia at Constantinople. Fig 6: Door-frame on the abbey-church at St. Denis, mid-12th century. Fig 7: Panel. Figs 8 and 9: Pillar-decoration from the cathedral at Bourges. Fig 10: Capital from the abbey-church at St. Benoit. Fig 11: Capital from the Barbarossa-palace at Gelnhausen. Fig 12: Arch-border from the church St. Amant de Boixe. Fig 13: Arch-border from the church at Gelnhausen, early 13th century. Fig 14: Console from the church at Gelnhausen, early 13th century. Fig 15: Decoration of a pillar-shaft from the church at Tournus, 12th century. Fig 16: Decoration of a pillar-shaft from cathedral at Chartres. Fig 17: From a door-frame from the former Benedictine-abbey-church at Ellwangen. Fig 18:Frieze in the interior of St. Walderich's chapel at Murrhardt. Figs 19 and 20: Arch-consols on the side-aisle of St. Sebald, Nuremberg. Fig 21: Key-stone-decoration in the same church. Fig 22: Key-stone-decoration from the cathedral at Bamberg'. Plate 34 from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898] (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/The Print Collector)
(RM) 407808451
ITALIAN RENAISSANCE PAINTED CERAMICS, (1898). CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Italian Renaissance painted ceramics, (1898). 'Fig 1: Lower termination of a Madonna-relief by the Robbia-school. Fig 2: Surface-pattern on the vestry-fountain in the church St. Maria novella at Florence. Figs 3-5: Border-decorations on dishes from the manufactory at Faenza. Fig 6: Belly-decoration on a handled vase from the same. Figs 7-9: Profile-decorations on a vase from the same. Fig 10: Profile-decoration on an inkstand from the same. Figs 11-13: Border-decorations on dishes from the same. Figs 14-19: Border-decorations on dishes from the manufactory at Chaffagiolo. Fig 20: Border-decorations on dishes from the manufactory at Gubbio. Figs 21-23: Border-decorations on dishes from the manufactory at Urbino. Figs 24-27: Divers vessels from the manufactory at Urbino. Fig 28: Dish from the manufactory at Pesaro. Fig 29: Border-decoration on a dish from the manufactory at Pesaro...The earthenware called 'majolica' in all probability derives its name from the island of Majorca, where glazed pottery was extensively manufactured, especially by the Moors, and whence this art found its way into Italy. In our days the term 'majolica' is generally applied to all finer fayence-ware, when executed with more care than coarser pottery i. e. to such earthenware, the main substance of which is potter's clay covered with nontransparent glaze, and coloured'. Plate 55 from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898] (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/The Print Collector)
(RM) 407808181
ITALIAN RENAISSANCE LACE, (1898). CREATOR: UNKNOWN.
Italian Renaissance lace, (1898). 'Figs 1, 2 and 3: Venetian point lace. Figs 4, 5 and 6: Venetian point lace in relief. Figs 7 and 8: Venetian point lace in relief with highly raised leaves. Fig 9: Roselina-lace. Fig 10: Reticella-lace. Fig 11: Italian Guipure. Fig 12: Genoa church-lace. Fig 13: Collar in Venetian Guipure...The art of lace-making, unknown to the ancients, and no doubt, not brought to artistic perfection previously to the close of the 15th century, may truly be called a creation of the Renaissance. And it is the soil of Italy, principally the two cities of Venice and Genoa, to which we owe the needle-made lace as well as the finest kind of pillow-lace. The former (the so-called point) is to be considered as the more precious kind. The method of making it - ground and ornament consisting of nothing but an infinity of stitches made a jour - admits of an extremely delicate and graceful formation. But its execution requires a very complicated and difficult process, as only small pieces of about 10 cm dimension can be made at a time, which, after being done, must be joined so as to form a complete whole, for which reason, in designing the patterns, the possibility of a scarcely visible joining of the several parts must be taken into account'. Plate 50 from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898] (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/The Print Collector)
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