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(RM) 478984901
WRIGHT FLYER TEST FLIGHTS AT FORT MYER, VIRGINIA, USA, SEPTEMBER 3, 1908. IN JANUARY 1908, AS A RESPONSE TO A WAR DEPARTMENT REQUEST FOR A "HEAVIER-THAN-AIR FLYING MACHINE", THE WRIGHT BROTHERS SUBMITTED A BID TO DESIGN A PLANE FOR $25,000. WHILE WILBUR W
Wright Flyer test flights at Fort Myer, Virginia, USA, September 3, 1908. In January 1908, as a response to a War Department request for a "Heavier-than-air Flying Machine", the Wright Brothers submitted a bid to design a plane for $25,000. While Wilbur went to Paris to promote the Wright Flyer, Orville designed a plane for the Army Signal Corps. From September 3-17, Orville performed test flights at Fort Myer. On September 17th a split propeller caused the plane to crash, injuring Orville and killing his passenger, Lieutenant Thomas Selfridge. In spite of the crash the Army believed that the Wright plane would work. In July 1909, when Orville was able to fly again, he completed the test flights and surpassed all the Army's requirements for a military plane: to carry a passenger for at least 125 miles at a speed of 40 miles per hour and stay aloft for at least one hour, easily transportable, controllable and steerable at all times and in all directions, and land without damage. On August 2, 1909, the Signal Corps accepted the Wright Flyer as the world's first military aircraft, naming it Signal Corps Airplane No. 1. Wright Flyer test flights at Fort Myer, Virginia, USA, September 3, 1908. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/HERITAGE SPACE)
(RM) 478984738
THE WORLD'S LARGEST WIND TUNNEL, AMES AERONAUTICAL LABORATORY, MOFFETT FIELD, CALIFORNIA, USA, 1947. 40 X 80 FOOT WIND TUNNEL WHICH, WHEN BUILT, WAS THE WORLD'S LARGEST. THE CAMERA IS STATIONED IN THE TUNNEL'S LARGEST SECTION, 173 FEET WIDE BY 132 FEET HI
The world's largest wind tunnel, Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Moffett Field, California, USA, 1947. 40 x 80 foot wind tunnel which, when built, was the world's largest. The camera is stationed in the tunnel's largest section, 173 feet wide by 132 feet high. Here at top speed the air, driven by six 40 foot fans, is moving about 35 to 40 miles per hour. The rapid contraction of the throat (or nozzle) speeds up this air flow to more than 250 miles per hour in the oval test section, which is 80 feet wide and 40 feet high. The tunnel encloses 900 tons of air, 40 tons of which rush through the throat per second at maximum speed. The experimental model seen here is almost 50 feet long. Embodying a sharply swept-back wing suitable for supersonic flight, it is undergoing tests designed to improve the landing characteristics of this type of airfoil. Mounted on struts connected to scales under the test section, it is "flown standing still" while each element such as lift and drag is measured and air pressures occurring across the wing are recorded. Information gathered from such tests were made available to the nation's aircraft manufacturers by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (now NASA). The world's largest wind tunnel, Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Moffett Field, California, USA, 1947. Creator: Unknown. (KEYSTONE/HERITAGE IMAGES/HERITAGE SPACE)
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