44 Objekte
WORLD PRESS PHOTO 2019 BRENT STIRTON - AKASHINGA - THE BRAVE ONES 036
PHUNDUNDU WILDLIFE AREA, ZIMBABWE, JUNE 2018: Petronella Chigumbura, 30, an elite member of the all female conservation ranger force known as Akashinga undergoes sniper movement and concealment training in the bush near their base. Akashinga (meaning the ‘Brave Ones’ in local dialect) is a community-driven conservation model, empowering disadvantaged women to restore and manage a network of wilderness areas as an alternative to trophy hunting. Many current western-conceived solutions to conserve wilderness areas struggle to gain traction across the African continent. Predominately male forces are hampered by ongoing corruption, nepotism, drunkenness, aggressiveness towards local communities and a sense of entitlement. The I.A.P.F, the International Anti-Poaching Foundation led by former Australian Special Forces soldier Damien Mander, was created as a direct action conservation organisation to be used as a surgical instrument in targeting wildlife crime. In 2017 they decided to innovate, using an all- female team to manage an entire nature reserve in Zimbabwe. The program builds an alternative approach to the militarized paradigm of "fortress conservation" which defends colonial boundaries between nature and humans. While still trained to deal with any situation they may face, the team has a community-driven interpersonal focus, working with rather than against the local population for the long-term benefits of their own communities and nature. (Brent Stirton, Getty Images) NO SALES, THIS MATERIAL IS FOR SINGLE USE PUBLICATIONS IN PRINT OR FOR A TEMPORARY ONLINE PUBLICATION, AND MAY BE USED EXCLUSIVELY TO PUBLICIZE THE 2019 WORLD PRESS CONTEST AND EXHIBITION. IT MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED AS PART OF AN ARTICLE OR ANY OTHER ITEM THAT CONTAINS NO DIRECT LINK TO WORLD PRESS PHOTO AND ITS ACTIVITIES. THE PICTURE MAY NOT BE CROPPED OR MANIPULATED IN ANY WAY. KEYSTONE PROVIDES ACCESS TO THIS PUBLICLY DISTRIBUTED HANDOUT PHOTO. THE COPYRIGHT IS OWNED BY A THIRD PARTY.
WORLD PRESS PHOTO 2019 MARY F. CALVERT - MALE RAPE 020
Former U.S. Marine Ethan Hanson finds himself unable to take showers because of the trauma he experienced during his military service so he struggles through a bath at home in Austin, MN. During US Marine Corps boot camp, Ethan and his fellow recruits were punished by their drill instructor for talking and laughing in the shower. For one hour they were ordered to walk naked from one end of the steamy “rain room” to the other all the while pressed together genitals to buttocks. Ethan joined a handful of recruits who reported the incident and the drill instructor was removed five days later. After that, the men were harassed and retaliated against by his colleagues. Ethan’s nightmares and panic attacks began immediately and he found himself too traumatized to do his job and eventually separated from the Marine Corps. .Austin, MN. April 25, 2018.This candid photo was shot two years after the previous picture of Ethan getting ready to go to bed. The progression of his trauma is evident. He gave me permission to be there in his bathroom to photograph him while he took his daily bath. (Mary F. Calvert) NO SALES, THIS MATERIAL IS FOR SINGLE USE PUBLICATIONS IN PRINT OR FOR A TEMPORARY ONLINE PUBLICATION, AND MAY BE USED EXCLUSIVELY TO PUBLICIZE THE 2019 WORLD PRESS CONTEST AND EXHIBITION. IT MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED AS PART OF AN ARTICLE OR ANY OTHER ITEM THAT CONTAINS NO DIRECT LINK TO WORLD PRESS PHOTO AND ITS ACTIVITIES. THE PICTURE MAY NOT BE CROPPED OR MANIPULATED IN ANY WAY. KEYSTONE PROVIDES ACCESS TO THIS PUBLICLY DISTRIBUTED HANDOUT PHOTO. THE COPYRIGHT IS OWNED BY A THIRD PARTY.
WORLD PRESS PHOTO 2019 NADIA SHIRA COHEN - GOD’S HONEY 040
Nuevo Durango Mennonite Camp, Campeche, Mexico-November 10, 2018: Peter Peter, 10 riding in his father's soy truck with the seasons soy harvest ready to be weighed and deposited in the silo where his father David Peter works. Mayan beekeepers of the Yucatan Peninsula have been grappling with contaminated honey ever since transgenic soy was introduced into the farming of the region. The soy is produced primarily by the continually expanding Mennonite community by a government supported subsidies program. Traces of the soy and glyphaste, the main agrotoxin used to kill off weeds around the resistant soy have been found in the honey which is of organic quality and which the Mayans export to Europe mainly through Germany. The honey which must now be labeled when it contains elements of the soy or toxins is being bought now at a much lower rate. The mennonites are also buying up land from the indigenous communities and cutting down virgin forrest land in order to expand there existing communities and create moer farm land. As a result many bees also disappear, wtih diminishing flowers to polinate. In 2015 the supreme court in Mexico ruled to prohibit the use of transgenic soy in the country, yet soy farmers have continued to plant the modified version and operate with impunity despite the law. (Nadia Shira Cohen) NO SALES, THIS MATERIAL IS FOR SINGLE USE PUBLICATIONS IN PRINT OR FOR A TEMPORARY ONLINE PUBLICATION, AND MAY BE USED EXCLUSIVELY TO PUBLICIZE THE 2019 WORLD PRESS CONTEST AND EXHIBITION. IT MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED AS PART OF AN ARTICLE OR ANY OTHER ITEM THAT CONTAINS NO DIRECT LINK TO WORLD PRESS PHOTO AND ITS ACTIVITIES. THE PICTURE MAY NOT BE CROPPED OR MANIPULATED IN ANY WAY. KEYSTONE PROVIDES ACCESS TO THIS PUBLICLY DISTRIBUTED HANDOUT PHOTO. THE COPYRIGHT IS OWNED BY A THIRD PARTY.
WORLD PRESS PHOTO 2019 BRENT STIRTON - FALCONS AND THE ARAB INFLUENCE 102
ABU DHABI, UAE: A falcon hunting camp in the desert outside Abu Dhabi, UAE. This camp uses captive bred Houbara Bustards, the preferred prey species of Arab Falconers across the region. In the UAE, where a huge amount of progress has occurred at an accelerated rate over the last 60 years, falconry is seen as a link back to the past and to the ancient culture of the Bedouin. Falcons were used for centuries for hunting food and the Arabs have a long association with falcons. Nowadays it is the sport of choice across the Arab world. Twenty years ago, most of the falcons used were from wild capture, a fact that meant falcons were taken from the wild and subjected to long and dangerous journeys from as far away as Siberia and Mongolia. Many did not survive and those that did often arrived sick and in poor condition. Most of those falcons also came from colder climates and did not survive the heat of the desert region. These days, the vast majority of falcons used in the UAE are captive bred birds. (Brent Stirton, Getty Images for National Geographic) NO SALES, THIS MATERIAL IS FOR SINGLE USE PUBLICATIONS IN PRINT OR FOR A TEMPORARY ONLINE PUBLICATION, AND MAY BE USED EXCLUSIVELY TO PUBLICIZE THE 2019 WORLD PRESS CONTEST AND EXHIBITION. IT MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED AS PART OF AN ARTICLE OR ANY OTHER ITEM THAT CONTAINS NO DIRECT LINK TO WORLD PRESS PHOTO AND ITS ACTIVITIES. THE PICTURE MAY NOT BE CROPPED OR MANIPULATED IN ANY WAY. KEYSTONE PROVIDES ACCESS TO THIS PUBLICLY DISTRIBUTED HANDOUT PHOTO. THE COPYRIGHT IS OWNED BY A THIRD PARTY.
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